Video: Man Gets Surprised When Trying to Remove a Fallen Tree

March 12, 2019 Updated: March 12, 2019

After using a chain saw to cut a fallen tree, a man—and onlookers—got a surprise: the tree sprang back into its original place.

While some people claim it’s “magic,” it’s really just simple physics.

The tree’s root and base weigh more than the top of the tree after it was cut down.

“My friend was cutting a fallen tree in my backyard and the tree went back to its place!” wrote Paul Firbas, who uploaded the clip online.

The video goes to show that logging and tree removal are dangerous jobs.

According to CNN Money, which named logging as the most dangerous job in the United States, “when loggers use handheld power saws, they’re much more vulnerable to injury from falling tree limbs and dangerous equipment.”

Pretty dangerous :O :O

NTD Television 发布于 2017年11月30日周四

“Those daily threats make logging the most dangerous job in the country, with 91.3 deaths per 100,000 workers in 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics,” CNN said.

The BLS’s Census of Fatal Occupation Injuries states that common injuries like falling branches and rough terrain can easily lead to death.

In 2015, the latest figures to date, there were 4,836 fatal work injuries, not counting members of the U.S. armed forces. Most of the jobs where fatalities were most frequent were done by men.

After logging, fishing was the second-most dangerous job in the United States, with a rate of 55 deaths per 100,000 workers, CNBC reported.

Fisherman Ron Onorato catches a bluefish in the waters off the Montauk shore in Long Island, New York, using traditional rod-and-reel methods. (Benjamin Chasteen/The Epoch Times)
Fisherman Ron Onorato catches a bluefish in the waters off the Montauk on Long Island, New York, using traditional rod-and-reel methods. (Benjamin Chasteen/The Epoch Times)

Third was aircraft pilots and flight engineers, with 40 deaths per 100,000.

Bright lights assumed to be lasers aimed into the cockpit of airplanes present a growing problem for pilots. (Yoshikazu Tsuno/Getty Images)
(Yoshikazu Tsuno/Getty Images)

Fourth was roofers at a rate of just under 40 per 100,000.

(Jom at German Wikipedia)
(Jom at German Wikipedia)

And fifth was refuse and recyclable material collectors (garbage men) with a rate of 39 per 100,000 deaths.

PILED UP: The Department of Sanitation will resume trash pickup in New York City on Monday. Collection was suspended due to the snowstorm that hit the city on Dec. 26. (Phoebe Zheng/The Epoch Times)
The Department of Sanitation will resume trash pickup in New York City on Monday. Collection was suspended due to the snowstorm that hit the city on Dec. 26. (Phoebe Zheng/The Epoch Times)

World’s Oldest Trees

Many a tree has quietly, peacefully stood watching the changes of the Earth for thousands of years.

1. Norway Spruce, Sweden

A Norway spruce in Sweden has a root system about 9,500 years old. It clones itself, meaning it grows a trunk that can live about 600 years, and when that one dies, it grows another. It’s longevity is similar to that of the phoenix of lore, reborn again and again yet essentially the same.

2. Methuselah, Bristlecone Pine, California

Bristlecone Pines
The ancient bristlecone pine trees in the White Mountains of the Inyo National Forest near Bishop, Calif. (Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images)

The mystique of the famous Methuselah tree is perpetuated not only by its almost 4,800 years of life, but also by the secrecy surrounding its location. The U.S. Forest Service keeps its location under wraps to protect it from vandalism and photos of the tree have also not been released. It is a bristlecone pine and it lives somewhere in California’s White Mountains along with many other ancient britstlecone pines.

It is named Methuselah for the oldest person in the Bible. To put its great age into perspective, the tree was about 1,350 years old when Egyptian Pharaoh Ramses II was born (around 1300 B.C.).

Bristlecone pines are able to survive so long, in part because of their dense and resinous wood, which is difficult for pests and fungi to penetrate.

Another bristlecone was discovered to be the oldest of its kind in 2012, at 5,062 years old (currently 5,064). The Forest Service has also kept the location of this tree a secret.

(Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images)

3. Llangernyw Yew, Wales

Llangernyw Yew
The Llangernyw yew tree in Llangernyw, Conwy, Wales. It is between 4,000 and 5,000 years old. (Stemonitis via Wikimedia Commons)

The Llangernyw Yew in Wales, UK, is estimated to be between 4,000 and 5,000 years old, according to the Urban Horticulture Institute at Cornell University. A couple of other yew trees in Europe are more than 2,000 years old. Some old chapels were housed in the hollowed out trunks of ancient yews and the oldest yews are often found in churchyards. In the Middle Ages, Europe’s yew population was heavily harvested as a favorite material for bow-making.

The secrets of the yew’s longevity include its ability to survive a split better than many other tree species; and its toxicity, which saves it from foraging animals.

Epoch Times’ Tara MacIsaac contributed to this report

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